The Unforgotten

The Unforgotten
A Novella and Other Stories
by Julia Ballerini

 

Stories in The Unforgotten, ranging from a novella to flash narratives of merely a paragraph, are populated by a variety of characters. Among them: Luisa, a beloved childhood servant in Peru, who disappears inexplicably. A child writes that her mom has a lover, a grownup word for boyfriend. Gertrude, whose lifelong collection of sophisticated words fades into dementia. Charles, a grandfather in a white nightgown and bobbing nightcap, chases a bull away from his wife’s beloved rose garden. A mother tells her child a story of a joyous snail with a will to live. Adrianna, now a grandmother, reminiscences about a college year in Paris with her best friend who later committed suicide. Henry, working in a research lab, befriends a rat he names Eloise.

 

To order, CLICK HERE.

The Talking Drum

The Talking Drum
By Lisa Braxton

It is 1971. The fictional city of Bellport, Massachusetts, is in decline with an urban redevelopment project on the horizon expected to transform this dying factory town into a thriving economic center. This planned transformation has a profound effect on the residents who live in Bellport as their own personal transformations take place. Sydney Stallworth steps away from her fellowship and law studies at an elite university to support husband Malachi’s dream of opening a business in the heart of the black community of his hometown, Bellport.

For Omar Bassari, an immigrant from Senegal, Bellport is where he will establish his drumming career and the launching pad from which he will spread African culture across the world. Della Tolliver has built a fragile sanctuary in Bellport for herself, boyfriend Kwamé Rodriguez, and daughter Jasmine, a troubled child prone to nightmares and outbursts.

The Talking Drum explores intraracial, class, and cross-cultural tensions, along with the meaning of community and belonging. It examines the profound impact gentrification has on people in many neighborhoods and the way in which being uprooted affects the fabric of their families, friendships, and emotional well-being.

The Talking DrumLisa Braxton’s debut, is beautifully written (perhaps why it’s being released by a press more known for their poetry), and transports us to early 1970s Massachusetts, where a predominantly black neighborhood is about to fall victim to the twin forces of gentrification and institutional racism, with a strong dose of corruption on the side.

Crime Reads

 

To order, CLICK HERE.
 

For information about the author, CLICK HERE.

Water Mask

Water Mask
By Monica Devine

Picture Alaska—her braided rivers and Arctic tundra, her tidal shorelines and thrashing salmon. Imagine flying over the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta with an inexperienced pilot, charging into an ever-changing rodeo of sky, clouds so thick it’s like flying through milk. Imagine Yup’ik elders whose humble behavior and reverence for their homeland teaches you more about living with intention than formal education ever could. Imagine learning that to practice deep listening is to practice silence. Imagine spending 21 days on a 42-foot trawler boating the Inside Passage.

Monica Devine’s new collection, Water Mask, captures these experiences alongside stories of New Mexico deserts, Wyoming horses, and family, making accessible through lyrical essays this remarkable American landscape.

Page Lamber, In Search of Kinship and Shifting Stars

 

In Water Mask, Monica Devine maps out a life in Alaska that explores issues of the human heart: fear, spiritual longing, memory, perception, loss and wonder. She skis woodland trails with her baby on her back, navigates sea ice with Beaufort Sea whalers, negotiates the deaths of her parents and endures the near loss of her cabin on the shape-shifting Copper River. In these captivating stories, Monica reflects on family, the importance of place, her work in Alaska Native villages, and more…all told against the background of a cold northern landscape that both rejects and beguiles.

 

To order, CLICK HERE.

In the Company of Rebels

In the Company of Rebels
A Generational Memoir of Bohemians, Deep Heads, and History Makers
By Chellis Glendinning

From Berkeley to Bolivia, from New York to New Mexico, our social-change movements have textured the 1950s through the present. The history makers presented in this “generational memoir” transformed the political/spiritual landscape of the U.S. and beyond, laying the foundation for contemporary thinking about equality and democracy.

Through 43 biographical sketches and memories of her personal friendships with each of them, the author creates a collective portrait of some of the rebels, artists, radicals, and thinkers who raised many of the issues of justice, ecology, feminism, and imperialism we are now familiar with.

Chellis Glendinning has written a memoir evoking the lives of women and men she has known. From Susan Griffin to Daniel and Patricia Ellsberg, Suzan Harjo to John Ross, they are some the most creative and courageous geniuses of a generation…. In the Company of Rebels is one of the most profoundly moving books I’ve read in years.

—Margaret Randall, Exporting Revolution

 

Psychologist/writer Chellis Glendinning has penned eight nonfiction books exploring psychological interfaces with social issues, as well as hundreds of essays in newspapers and magazines, a poetry book, and a bilingual opera. Off the Map and Chiva both won the National Federation of Press Women Book Award in nonfiction. She lives now in Bolivia where she wrote her first novel, Objetos, and is working on a second about three women in the Chaco War (1932-35).

To order, CLICK HERE.

Through the Lens of Love: Facing Terminal Illness

Through the Lens of Love: Facing Terminal Illness
A Memoir by Robin Gross


Through the Lens of Love: Facing Terminal Illness is an open-hearted, inspiring story of the two years Robin’s husband, Dr. Richard (Dick) Gross, was dying from glioblastoma (GBM), an aggressive form of brain cancer. If you or your loved one has been diagnosed with a terminal illness, this book will guide you through the days and months to come. Robin will be your voice of reason, your shoulder to cry on, and your light at the end of the tunnel.

When Dick and his wife Robin receive news that he has GBM, the life they built together over forty years abruptly changed in one day. With the help of family, friends, and acquaintances, his last two years became an unexpected, extraordinary part of Dick’s life. Through the Lens of Love: Facing Terminal Illness is foremost a love story that brings you on an amazing journey which begins on a photography trip to Monet’s Garden in France and ends with an emotional reunion in Callaway Gardens, Georgia. 

Anyone who has been touched by glioblastoma will hear their own voice echoed somewhere in Robin’s book. With gentle yet exquisite and sometimes humorous style, she invites readers to explore her family, faith, & friendship. 

— Jo Simpson, MSN, spouse of glioblastoma patient

 

Why do we write books? In the hopes our story, experiences, lessons learned might help others. Kudos to Robin Gross for honoring her husband, family and community for their loving support through her dark night of the soul. You will be inspired and uplifted by the humanity demonstrated in this book – and will be motivated to reach out to those around you to re-establish what matters most in good times and bad – kindness, compassion and connection. Read it and reap.                             

— Sam Horn, SOMEDAY Is Not a Day in the Week

 

 To order, CLICK HERE.

The Full Moon Herald

The Full Moon Herald
By Phyllis Klein

The Full Moon Herald By Phyllis Klein is a book of poetry in newspaper format filled with real news stories, and personal news stories. It travels the ground of trauma, grief, empathy, and hope.

From Minder-Binder Review of Books:
This exceptional first book of poems should be required reading for anyone who 1) appreciates poetry as a meaningful way to explore who we are in this beautiful and troubling world; 2) is willing to open themselves to the honesty and intimacy of our shared and connected lives; and/or 3) wishes to mine the deeper nature of the news without the noise and nonsense of talking heads. 


”Phyllis Klein’s remarkable poems make hidden wounds visible as she digs into the Breaking News. Entering this world, you breathe in the fresh air of honesty. You fume, you weep with her along the treacherous paths she travels, to finally understand we are ‘relatives in the fields of trees, beauty and devastation we call home.’ Such good news.”

— Perie Longo, author of Baggage Claim

 

“Phyllis Klein is a poet of great courage. She brings what Ezra Pound called poetry: ’the news that stays news.’ Her determination to see and name what we are afraid to face powers the headlines of this startling debut collection.”

— Jack Ridl, author of Saint Peter and the Goldfinch

 

To order, CLICK HERE

How to Make a Life, A Novel

How to Make a Life, A Novel
By Florence Reiss Kraut


When Ida and her daughter Bessie flee a catastrophic pogrom in Ukraine for America in 1905, they believe their emigration will ensure that their children and grandchildren will be safe from harm. But choices and decisions made by one generation have ripple effects on those who come later—and in the decades that follow, family secrets, betrayals, and mistakes made in the name of love threaten the survival of the family: Bessie and Abe Weissman’s children struggle with the shattering effects of daughter Ruby’s mental illness, of Jenny’s love affair with her brother-in-law, of the disappearance of Ruby’s daughter as she flees her mother’s legacy, and of the accidental deaths of Irene’s husband and granddaughter. 

A sweeping saga that follows four generations from the tenements of Brooklyn through WWII, from Woodstock to India, and from Spain to Israel, How to Make a Life is the story of a family who must learn to accept each other’s differences—or risk cutting ties with the very people who anchor their place in the world.

2020 Best Book Awards Finalist in Fiction: Women’s Fiction

A moving novel of four generations of an immigrant family whose characters are so real I cannot forget them.

–Tessa Smith McGovern, London Road Linked Stories, host/producer of BookGirl TV.

 

An engaging and heartfelt portrayal of intergenerational trauma and hope.

―Kirkus Reviews

 

A wonderful gift and great for book club discussions.  Author will Zoom at no cost with book club meetings. 

For ordering information, CLICK HERE.
 

Emerging Voices

Emerging Voices

Emergingvoices.co.uk is a quarterly online webzine. Based in London, the webzine presents voices from around the globe reflecting the personal and the political through paintings, poetry, essays, photography and video.

Going into its third year, Emerging Voices features have included:

Paintings linking visual art and politics
Poetry and sculptural art
Photography about politics and religion
Artists addressing climate change
Readings on mothers and daughters
Essays from Armenia, Zimbabwe and South Africa
… and much more.

Rose Levinson, Ph.D., formerly of Berkeley, is Founder and Managing Editor of Emerging Voices. Her writings appear each quarter.

Join our free subscriber list to be updated on quarterly postings.

We welcome your responses, comments and short submissions to our Subscriber Salon.

For more information, please visit emergingvoices.co.uk

Never Retreat

Never Retreat
By Bonnie McCune


A SUSPENSEFUL, INTELLIGENT ROMANCE

A feisty single mom clashes with an ex-military, macho corporate star in the wild Colorado mountains. Only one can win a huge prize, but when a massive flood imperils love and survival, they learn the meaning of true partnership.

Years ago, Ramona Soto faced harsh reality after a roving con man knocked her up. Now she’s concentrating on her career in a major telecommunications firm and funding college for her teenaged son. Enter Desmond Emmett—a fast talker and smooth operator. New to the office, the ex-serviceman is a guy Raye should avoid.

Thrown together at a corporate retreat in the wilderness, the reluctant duo struggle to complete extreme mental and physical tests for a huge reward. But only one can win, and Des needs to underwrite medical treatments for his adored sister.

See-sawing between attraction and antagonism, the mismatched couple face their biggest challenge, as a massive flash flood sweeps down the rocky canyon to threaten their love and survival. Can they put aside their difference to rescue their colleagues—and their future as a couple?

This is a new type of women’s fiction. Unafraid to debate contemporary concerns, it pulls no punches with a fresh look at age-old issues. This is your kind of writing if you think people are smarter than every phone, you’ll take a human over the most advanced app, and you can laugh at yourself as well as others.

Purchase at Amazon, other online sellers, and Totally Bound
https://www.totallybound.com/book/never-retreat-print

The Topography of Hidden Stories

The Topography of Hidden Stories
By Julia MacDonnell

A National Indie Excellence Awards Finalist 2021

The stories in Julia MacDonnell’s first collection, The Topography of Hidden Stories create a shining tapestry of women’s lives in the late 20th and the early 21st centuries. Her characters, among them women trapped in a pious patriarchy that has yet to loosen its control of women’s lives, grapple with doubt and disquiet in their search for love and connection. However difficult their situations, they confront experience with sharp eyes, ironic wit, and a sense of their own historical matrix.

Kirkus Reviews:
MacDonnell’s writing is frequently elegant, full of vivid metaphors…and descriptive language. The plots are both familiar and unpredictable, drawing readers in while challenging their preconceptions…. A strong collection of stories connected by deep Irish American roots.

Midwest Book Review, D. Donovan, Senior Reviewer:
The Topography of Hidden Stories holds many hidden gems…Dissimilar, evocative, and compelling, these snapshots freeze pivotal moments in time. They will captivate readers looking for literary examples of women trapped by circumstance and fate, their choices, their commitments to family, and their illusions and realities about the world and their place in it.

Readers seeking stories of growth and change and women’s evolving lives will find The Topography of Hidden Stories hard-hitting and thought-provokingly unexpected in its diversity and impact.

Indie Reader, Stephani Hren:
Julia MacDonnell …can cut to the quick of a character with a single sentence, or …stretch her exploration through an entire story…There’s an element of yearning to MacDonnell’s writing that makes her stories utterly entrancing and the characters, conflicts, and relationships that she’s crafted are deeply insightful.

 

To order, CLICK HERE.

A Land Like You

A Land Like You
By Tobie Nathan
Translated from the French by Joyce Zonana


 

An ode to the Egyptian Land, to its inhabitants—humans or spirits—and most of all to its mothers, magicians and nurses.

Parutions

 

A captivating tale that moves from street to street . . . from era to era . . . a world where Jews and Arabs lived together…

Le Figaro

 

Set in Cairo’s old Jewish Quarter in the first half of the twentieth century, A Land Like You follows the lives of Jewish Zohar and Muslim Masreya, “milk-twins” bound by an earth-shaking love. Part fantastical fable, part realistic history, the novel draws on ethno-psychiatrist Tobie Nathan’s Jewish Egyptian heritage and deep knowledge of North African folk beliefs to create a bewitching tapestry where spirit possession and religious mysticism exist side by side with sober facts about the British occupation of Egypt and the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood and the Free Officers’ Movement.

From the dingy hovels of the city’s poorest residents to the glittering palaces of the wealthy international aristocracy, A Land Like You exists in visual and auditory splendor.

– Sarah Richards, Foreword Reviews

 

Tobie Nathan is professor emeritus of psychology at Université-Paris VIII and the author of a dozen novels and numerous psychoanalytic studies.

Joyce Zonana, writer and literary translator, is a regular contributor to the blog, Feminism and Religion, and the author of a memoir, Dream Homes: From Cairo to Katrina, an Exile’s Journey.

To order, CLICK HERE

My Blue Skin Lover

My Blue Skin Lover
By Monona Wali

 

Winner of the Independent Book Publishers Gold Award for Multi-Cultural Fiction

 

One autumn night the Hindu god Shiva slips into the bedroom of 32-year old Anjali Mehta, and triggers an erotic and dangerous dissembling of her marriage and her life. Set in New York City, My Blue Skin Lover is one woman’s headlong journey into personal transformation.

“This small, lovely book is unpredictable to the very end, centered around a topic rarely seen in contemporary literature—the disruption that a true spiritual awakening can cause in an everyday life. Monona Wali’s depiction of American East Indians is a special pleasure, and this fine debut novel’s treatment of the stresses of academic life and upwardly mobile marriage is spot on.”
 — Janet Fitch, bestselling author of White Oleander and Paint It Black

“A dangerous and wise book that I love.” — Jim Krusoe, author of The Sleep Garden and Parsifal



A universal collective story of desire.” — Andrew Tonkovich, host of KPFK’s Bibliocracy

Available from Independent booksellers and Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Blue-Skin-Lover-Monona-Wali/dp/0983119171/

More about Monona Wali: www.mononawali.com

Sign Up, Subscribe, Get Announcements

Sign Up for Issues and Announcements


 

Welcome, Persimmon Tree reader! Thank you so much for signing up. In addition to getting an email whenever there is a new issue for you to read, you’ll also now start receiving a limited number of other notices from us. We’ll let you know whenever there’s a writing contest, a fundraiser, or another magazine event. But, we promise that your email address will be held in the strictest confidence and never shared with other organizations or sites.

 

Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy


This is the privacy policy for the website of Persimmon Tree magazine.

Information We Collect and How We Use It

We collect:

  • The IP Address (a string of characters identifying a computer or device on the internet) of all visitors to the website.
  • Aggregate information on what pages website users access or visit, the time of day and duration of their stay.

We use this information to:

  • Improve the content and usability of our website;
  • Communicate with our subscribers;
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We do NOT share this information with other organizations for any purpose.

As you make donations:

Persimmon Tree has contracted with PayPal (www.paypal.com) for online donations. PayPal protects your financial information with industry-leading security and fraud prevention systems. When you use PayPal, your financial information is not shared with the merchant. Once your payment is complete, you will be emailed a receipt for this transaction.

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The Persimmon Tree website uses cookies to ensure that only registered users view online content and features. We do not track which features or content each individual user visits and we do not associate or aggregate that information based on your email address.

We do not use cookies to store any of your personal information.

Contacting You

If you do not want to receive e-mail from Persimmon Tree, please let us know by sending an email to us at info@persimmontree.org and telling us that you do not want to receive email
from Persimmon Tree.

Contacting Us

Our Editor is Sue Leonard. Her contact information is editor@persimmontree.org.
Our Publisher is Nan Fink Gefen.

Our postal address is Persimmon Tree Magazine, 255 East 78th Street, New York, NY 10075.

Submissions

Our Submissions Policies

Persimmon Tree’s mission is to bring the creativity and talent of women over sixty to a wide audience of readers of all ages. We are looking for work that reveals rich experience and a variety of perspectives. Each issue of the magazine will include several fiction and nonfiction pieces, poetry by one or more poets, and the work of one or more visual artists. The magazine is published quarterly, in association with Mills College.

IMPORTANT SUBMISSIONS REQUIREMENT:

Subscriptions to Persimmon Tree are free, but, for your work to be considered, you must be a subscriber. Sign up for your subscription here:


 

Fiction and Nonfiction: We welcome previously unpublished pieces under 3,500 words, written by women over sixty. Submissions may be sent to us any time during the year. Several readers will review your submission, and we will respond to you within six months. Multiple submissions are accepted. If you want to send more than one piece, put them in separate emails.

Please send your submission as an attachment to us at: Submissions@persimmontree.org. Type the title of the piece, labeled fiction or non-fiction, in the subject line. Include a brief biographical statement (less than 50 words) in your email. The attached document must be saved in MS Word or a compatible program. If we can’t open it, it won’t be read. We will respond to you online.

Submissions should be double-spaced, with 12-point type and numbered pages. At the top of the first page please enter author’s name, address, telephone number, and email address.

Art: We welcome submissions of work in all media. Artists are invited to send no more than five samples of their work (as jpegs) and a short biographical statement (less than 50 words) for us to put on file. Submissions should be addressed to submissions@persimmontree.org and may be sent any time during the year. Please do not expect a response from us unless we plan to use your work.

Poetry: We accept submissions of poetry two times a year when we hold competitions; we publish the winning poems submitted from poets who live in a specific geographical region. Please no simultaneous submissions for competitions.

Poetry manuscripts must use the following guidelines to be considered:

(1) Previously unpublished poems by women over sixty should be emailed to the judge for that competition at the provided email address, not to Persimmon Tree directly. Poems must be in English.

(2) Include 1-3 poems in a single WORD attachment. No poem may be longer than a page; use 12-point type.

(3) In the subject line of the email message, type PERSIMMON TREE POETRY COMPETITION and your last name. In the body of the message, include your name, phone number, email and postal mailing address.

If your submission does not follow these guidelines, it will be deleted. You will not be notified.

Poets whose work is selected for publication will be asked to send short bios and photos, and will need to be available for proofreading their poems. We will let you know if your poem(s) has been accepted or not.

Regions for Competitions:

East Coast States (ME, VT, NH, CT, MA, RI, NY, NJ, DE, MD, DC, VA, NC, SC, GA, FL)

Western States (WA, OR, CA, AK, HI, NV, ID, AZ, UT, MT, WY, CO, NM)

Central States (TX, OK, KS, NE, SD, ND, MN, IA, MO, AR, LA, MS, AL, TN, KY, IN, MI, WI, IL, OH, WV, PA)

International Poets (not living in the US)

Next Competition:
Winter Issue (estimated publication date: December 15, 2021)
East Coast Poets

Submissions accepted: September 15, 2021, to November 1, 2021 (dates subject to change)
Guest Judge: TK

Short Takes: The Editors choose a different Short Takes topic for every issue. Short Takes are usually short pieces, fiction or non-fiction (250-500 words), but can also be topical poetry, sometimes even drawings or photography. We’re especially interested in hearing about your experiences, but you can include your thoughts, dreams, ideas and opinions. Humor and irony are always appreciated!

Please follow these guidelines:

  • Your submission MUST be on the topic for this issue; you’ll find the topic listed below. Pieces that do not follow this guideline will not be considered.
  • Please submit your Short Take as a Word attachment to an email. Address the email to editor@persimmontree.org. In the subject line of the email, type SHORT TAKES, the title of the piece and your last name. [Example: Short Takes, “Editing a Life,” Leonard]
  • At the top of the first page enter your name, address, telephone, and email address. Make sure to include the topic and title of the piece. Without this information, we cannot get back to you if we use the piece.

You may submit to Short Takes as often as you choose.

We will contact you only if your piece is selected. Because our choices are determined by our need for balance and diversity, we cannot include all the good pieces we receive.

Topic for our next issue: Secrets
Submissions deadline: August 15, 2021

 

 

Donations

Our Donations Policy

 

Persimmon Tree’s mission is to bring the creativity and talent of women over sixty to a wide audience of readers of all ages. We are looking for work that reveals rich experience and a variety of perspectives. Each issue of the magazine will include several fiction and nonfiction pieces, poetry by one or more poets, and the work of one or more visual artists. The magazine is published quarterly, in association with Mills College.

We at Persimmon Tree are dedicated to bringing you creative fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and art from women over sixty.

Our commitment comes from seeing too many excellent older women writers and artists ignored or disregarded. We live in a youth-oriented society that fails to validate, much less venerate, these women’s talent and skill. Yet they have so much to offer. Decades of life experience have prepared them to speak to the largest questions, and they know how to do this in a multiplicity of ways.

Persimmon Tree wants to make older women’s work available to all ages.

The task is huge. Those of us who are doing it are volunteers, except for our web staff. The editor puts in very long hours, as do the contributing editors. Creating a magazine takes a lot of time and money.

We’re deeply committed—but you can help, too.
Consider sending a donation.
No amount is too small; everything will be very much appreciated.
If you wish to, you can designate your donation in honor of or in memory of an individual.
(For information on our privacy policy, click here.)

1. Click here to pay with a credit card

Make a donation

 

2. If you would prefer to contribute by check, you can do so by making out your check to Persimmon Tree and mailing it to

Jean Zorn
Publisher
Persimmon Tree
399 E 72nd Street Apt 18C
New York, New York 10021

 

*Persimmon Tree is a tax exempt charitable organization, pursuant to IRC Section 501(c)(3). Persimmon Tree is also a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. All contributions to Persimmon Tree, whether made by check directly to Persimmon Tree or by credit card via Fractured Atlas, are tax-deductible to the fullest extent permitted by law. 

However you make your gift, and whatever its size, many thanks in helping to grow this persimmon tree!

2021 DONORS

Here is a list of the donations Persimmon Tree received from you, our very generous readers and supporters, from January 1, 2021, through June 15, 2021. We try to ensure that this list is as complete, up to date, and accurate as it can be, but if you see any mistakes in it, or if anyone’s name is missing, please let us know, and we’ll make a correction as soon as we can.

Sponsors have contributed $100 or more; sustainers have contributed from $50 to $99, and supporters have contributed up to $49. We are grateful to all our donors, no matter the size of your gift. It is only because of your generosity that Persimmon Tree is able to continue to highlight the talent and creativity of older women.

Sponsors

Anonymous
Marian Baldy
Lisa Boldt
Janet Brof
Sally Buffington
Kitty Cunningham
Catherine Flaherty
Marcia Freedman
Gail Gilliland
Adele Glimm
Melinda Halpert
Grace Harde
Rochelle Lefkowitz
Prudence Lev
Jacquelyn Marie
Lucy Marx
Marilyn Mazur
Margaret Mazzaferro
Ruth Minka
Elizabeth Mornin
Melanie Perish
Schwartz Family Fund
Adrienne Sciutto
Julia Spring
Beverly Stock
Mary Tilghman
April Vollmer

Sustainers

Anonymous
Carolyn Lee Arnold
Wendy Barker
Greta Berman
Patricia Boswell
Patricia Brawley
Lisa Braxton-Reid
Mary Ellen Capek
Myriam Chapman
Ann Chase
Susan Dworkin
Elana Dykewomon
Audrey Ferber
Walt Fujii
Bernard Goldschmidt
Eugenia Grohman
Robin Gross
Marjorie Hanft
Sally Hess
Cynthia Hogue
Ann Humphrey
Maj-Britt Johnson
Antoinette Kennedy
Claire Keyes
Sarah Kotchian
Marianne Kranz
Maureen Lahey
Rose Levinson
Catharine Lucas
Marylee MacDonald
Ronna Magy
Martha Mendelsohn
Heidi Messner
Joan Moritz
Mary Mullen
Nancy Piore
Sylvia Ramos Cruz
Kathleen Robinson
Susan Roche
Paula Rudnick
Kathleen Sampson
Susan Schoch
Deborah Shepherd
Ann F Stanford
Patricia Sullivan
Anne-Marie Sutton
Mary Thomas
windflower Townley
Norma Tucker
Mardi Tuminaro
Mary Waters
Ellen Wiener
Renee Winter
Carol Wright

Supporters

Anonymous
Liz Abrams-Morley
Gail Arnoff
Sing Baker
Lois Barr
Margo Berdeshevsky
Carol Biederman
Alice Bloch
Barbara Bolton
Paula Bonnell
Elga Antonsen Brown
Theresa Brown
Judith Carroll
Wendy Cleveland
Patty Cogen
Kathleen Corcoran
Nancy Corlis
Elaine Cory
Caroline Coyle
Malinda Crispin
Henrietta Dahlstrom
Marie Daniely
Lynne Davis
Louise Dolan
Mary Donaldson-Evans
Noma Edwards
Rosanne Ehrlich
Cynthia Elder
Judith Emilie
Rebecca Evans
Susan Florence
Gaye Gambell-Peterson
Nicolette Golding
Anita Gorman
Janet Harrison
Judi Hollis
Susan Huebner
Claire Kahane
Anne Kaier
Sharon Kennedy
Gurupreet Khalsa
Susan Koppelman
Pamela Kress-Dunn
Sue Leonard
Antonia Lewandowski
Yvonne Lorvan
Mardith Louisell
Carol Luther
Carol Marsh
Gretchen MacLachlan
Laurie McCray
Linda Melick
Lynn C Miller
Angie Minkin
Nancy Montague
Leslie Moore
Carol Nadell
Charlene Neely
Pietrina Pensabene
Stephanie Percival
Clorisa Phillips
Nancy Poling
Martina Reaves
Ellen Reichman
Bethany Reid
Lynne Reitman
Lois Rosen
Eleanor Rubin
Nan Rush
Marcia Rutan
Susan Sailer
Ruth Saxton
Carla Schick
Elaine G. Schwartz
Ursula Shepherd
Alice Simpson
S.L. Stevens
Carol Sunde
Eleanor Swent
Nina Tassi
Jamie Lyn Weaver
Judith Wells
Margaret Willey
Marty Williams
Nancy Wolitzer
Ellen Woods
Madelyn Young
Jean Zorn

Write Well 2016, 2017 & 2018 Award Winners

Persimmon Tree is thrilled to announce that three of our stories have won 2016 Write Well Awards, one story won a 2017 and another story won a 2018 Write Well Award.

Our 2018 winner is:

Joyce H. Munro, Be Jubilant My Feet   (Winter, 2018)

“Be Jubilant My Feet” is a war story, though it takes place far from the front lines. It is the inner war of a naïve student whose bubble of religiosity is pricked by the injustice and inequality she sees on TV. Given the setting, I could have portrayed her succumbing to the pressure of conforming to rules yet again and thus endeth the lesson. Instead, I wanted to explore how her propensity for guile and her awakening conscience might play out when much more is at stake than childhood or college rules.

 

Our 2017 winner is:

Joan Newburger for “A Bad Day in the Promised Land” (Winter, 2017)
“A Bad Day in the Promised Land” is one in a series of stories about the Selig and Aaronson families and centered on Eleanor Aaronson. They are in part autobiographical and were inspired by an older relative’s tales of the checkered and colorful history of the author’s Southern Jewish family, the Newburger branch having arrived in the South from Germany before the Civil War.
Click here to read “A Bad Day in the Promised Land”

 

Our 2016 winners are:

Melody Mansfield for “Fertilizer” (Fall, 2015)
Mansfield conveys subtle details of aging and senility through the tasks of gardening. She begins: “Deadheading is an art. You have to look for the bud, and then make the cut just above it. … What relief it must be, after growing, bursting, blooming, to be cut free, finally, at the end. No dishonor in that.”
Click here to read “Fertilizer”

Gail A. Webber for “Never Waste a Good Hole” (Fall, 2015)
“My father was passionate about holes, and for him, any patch of exposed dirt in the yard was cause for celebration.” See if you can figure out why the teller of this story is digging her own hole in her front yard before Webber explains.
Click here to read “Never Waste a Good Hole”

Ann Tracy for “Quiet Girls” (Winter, 2016)
Tracy, recounting the events of Winter Carnival, evokes the plight of quiet college girls in 1960 (and before). Winter Carnival at Aubrey College is a time for many groups to come together; one of the highlights being “the production … of fraternity and sorority snow sculptures.” The women created a sculpture of Sleeping Beauty, “the ultimate Quiet Girl.” What happened to her will shock you. Or, perhaps not.
Click here to read “Quiet Girls”

2016_write-well-award-kindle-cover Congratulations to our contributors! We are so proud of them and so pleased that they let us share their work in our magazine.

The pieces have been included in the 2016 Write Well Anthology and Newburger’s piece has been included in the 2017 Anthology. You can purchase a copy of the 2016 Anthology here on Amazon.com and/or a copy of the 2017 Anthology also on Amazon.com.

Sadly, Write Well has ended their program. You may still order the 2016 and 2017 Kindle versions from Amazon, but there is no book available for the 2018 winners. It was a wonderful idea and we are sorry to see it go.

Advertising in ArtsMart

Our Advertising Policy

Persimmon Tree accepts ads by women related to literature and the arts, including publications, performances, openings, workshops, groups, and so on.

The page can be accessed from anywhere in the magazine by clicking on ArtsMart, which is at the top of every page.

Size

If you wish us to format your ad, please provide up to 250 words of text; a main head and optional subheads, as well as one hyperlink to the website (e.g., point of sale, personal web site), and
a single image no larger than 130 x 190 pixels, in either JPG or GIF file format.

Display ads (provided as a single image in either JPG or GIF file format) must be no less that 580 pixels wide, and can be no more than 700 pixels in length.

Rates

1x placement (3 months online) $110
2x placement (6 months online) $175
3x placement (9 months online) $225
4x placement (1 year online) $255

Deadlines

Issue Reservations Copy
Summer May 31 June 7
Fall September 15 October 1
Winter November 30 December 7
Spring March 9 March 12

Reservations and Payment

To reserve space, email ads@persimmontree.org. Payment is required to secure your reservation.

Pay by Check

Checks payable to Persimmon Tree can be mailed to Persimmon Tree, c/o Jean Zorn, 399 E 72nd Street, Apt 18C, New York, NY 10021.

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ArtsMart Plan




Contact Us

Email ads@persimmontree.org. If you prefer to speak by phone, please include a phone number and times when you can be reached. Our volunteer ad coordinator will contact you.